Dr. Karl A. Rose Presentation on the Use of Adhesive Dentistry for Teeth Reconstruction

At Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington, we pride ourselves on providing high-quality care to each of our patients. We also look to how we can educates our patient to help them make good oral hygiene choices. Part of education and community involvement has to do with engaging in the field of dentistry and in the community. Our office and professionals are always engaged in continuing education and invested in staying up to date on current practices and technologies in the field of dentistry, specifically periodontics and implant dentistry.

Along with this, our office, including Dr. Karl A. Rose, engages in creating and researching new information and contributing that information to the field. Dr. Rose recently gave a presentation on one way to better the field of dentistry that he has seen and observed as he practices at Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington.

Dr. Rose Presents at Comprehensive Care Study Sessions

Dr. Rose gave this presentation on September 15th, 2017. He presented information at the Comprehensive Care Study Sessions, which is a member organization of the international Seattle Study Club. This event was held all-day as part of a Continuing Education lecture and workshop. The event was held at the Beacon Hotel in Washington DC.

This continuing education event focused on the use of Adhesive Dentistry related to reconstruction of teeth for patients who have advanced tooth wear problems and conditions as well as patients who are unable to afford the placement of crowns on all of their teeth. The event was about how Adhesive Dentistry can allow these patients to afford treatment by accomplishing these goals over time as opposed to in one sitting through crowns. The event also focused on how rebuilding teeth can be done more conservatively in many cases so that the goals are better accomplished.

Presentation on Adhesive Dentistry

Dr. Rose presented on how Adhesive Dental procedures and techniques can be a better method than using crowns (or caps) which can damage teeth more than the adhesive techniques do. Adhesive Dental techniques and the bonding materials used to attach to the tooth are less damaging overall than crowns. The event concluded with a hands-on workshop that accompanied the lecture. This workshop was provided by the 3M Corporation which is a leader in the field of dental materials and techniques. Many attendees learned new techniques and approaches at the course and were happy with their experience there.

Dr. Rose was thrilled to be able to present his research and information to attendees at the lecture and pass on that information to other doctors and dentists in the field. He is also glad to be able to implement his information and skills on the use of adhesive dentistry for teeth reconstruction to his patients at Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington.

Learn More

To learn more about Dr. Rose and the different treatments he provides, visit http://www.periodontistwashingtondc.com. Our office is happy to answer any questions you might have or to schedule an appointment with an industry leader in periodontics and implant dentistry in the Washington DC area.

Periodontist Dr. Rose Explains why Brushing Properly is Better than Brushing Often

Many people in America learn at a young age to brush their teeth three times a day. The fact is that dental decay and gum disease are caused by bacterial plaque that colonize on your teeth, and if you remove them one time a day you will stay free of periodontal disease. It really is that simple.

In the 1950s, toothpaste companies started promoting brushing three times per day for freshness so we would use more of their product. Even brushing that often, however, does not mean plaque is being fully removed.

People are taught to brush their teeth by their parents or their siblings. When they are taught how to clean their teeth in a dental office it is often a cursory service–which is time consuming. There is a long history and rationale behind why dental offices do not really focus on training their patients to clean their teeth to be free of bacterial plaque. Much like a golf or tennis coach can teach somebody how to become a good player, teaching people how to remove plaque is time consuming. This training requires practice and effort, it is not always much fun for the teacher, and not always that interesting for the person being taught. In addition, people are not used to paying to learn how to remove plaque from their teeth. People will pay for tennis, golf, or music lessons, but most people think they already know how to brush their teeth, so they do not value this instruction.

Patients who spend the time and the investment in our office to be taught how to remove plaque from their teeth when they brush save the expense of unhealthy teeth and gums over time. We advocate frequent brushing, but if someone brushes properly just once a day and does a thorough job of removing plaque, that individual is likely to have a healthy mouth.

Dr. Karl A. Rose
Periodontist
Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington
Chevy Chase, MD
New Patients Welcome
www.periodontistwashingtondc.com

Patients Need to Be Taught How to Properly Remove Plaque from Their Teeth

In the culture of the United States, a sizable portion of the population learns how to clean their teeth at a relatively early age. Still, even in America there are plenty of people who really have not learned the proper and effective way of removing plaque fully from their teeth.

We are bombarded with television advertisements for toothpaste, and our parents or siblings initially teach us that we must brush our teeth, but that does not always include using the most effective technique. We grow up learning that we should be brushing our teeth three times a day, but we know today that one does not even need to use a particular brand of toothpaste to clean teeth free of plaque.

In our practice we teach patients how to remove plaque, while enjoying the freshness of using traditional toothpastes as well.

The axiom “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” is so true. The fact is that if you clean your teeth effectively you will likely have minimal dental disease throughout your life. Learning how to clean your teeth effectively is of much greater value than paying dental insurance premiums.

Here is a success story of a patient who simply needed to understand how to properly remove plaque from her teeth–which most of us call “brushing your teeth.” My patient had been under the treatment of a few periodontists since she was in her 20’s, and under their care for approximately 20 years. She had lost teeth over time and was becoming desperately concerned about losing more teeth as time passed.

I examined, diagnosed and planned treatment for her. I trained her how to clean her teeth free of bacterial plaque, effectively, one time a day. Her periodontal disease was successfully treated and she has been healthy for years since. Her missing teeth were replaced via dental implants and she has had them now for more than 15 years. The implants are still healthy, also. This patient success story is often the experienced by other patients who also learn how to remove plaque from their teeth.

Dr. Karl A. Rose
Periodontist
Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington
Chevy Chase, MD
New Patients Welcome
www.periodontistwashingtondc.com

Correct Diagnosis is the Key to Proper Dental Treatment

I learned a very important concept during my specialty training. My greatest mentor taught me that there are many ways to treat a problem but there is only one correct diagnosis. Over the years the wisdom of this remark has become very clear to me: one cannot provide reliable and effective treatment for a patient unless an accurate diagnosis has been made.

The entire dental education process, including the endpoint, is about making something—such as a filling or a crown, or perhaps cementing a bridge or delivering the dentures to the patient. Dentistry is full of these very mechanically oriented processes and in this way it resembles trade school education.

While learning mechanics is important, dental students often focus on what they are doing rather than why they are doing it. When studying dentistry in universities, for example, students do not receive adequate training in how to diagnose and understand the system so that complex treatment approaches can be generated and applied. Most dentists only come to a fuller understand of diagnostics after dental school when they pursue either a specialty education program or continuing dental education courses through their career.

Second opinions are a useful part of the diagnostic process for practitioners who care about their patients and who want to be great at what they do for them. The objective of a second opinion is to have another clinician take a comprehensive look at the patient, question all the assumptions made by the first dentist, and delve deeply into the nature of the problem. A second opinion is a great way to either confirm a diagnosis or arrive at the correct diagnosis.

By placing an emphasis on diagnosis and not being afraid to seek a second opinion, dentists can provide optimal care for patients.

Dr. Karl A. Rose
Periodontist
Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington
Chevy Chase, MD
New Patients Welcome
www.periodontistwashingtondc.com

Genetics Play a Role in Oral Health and Periodontal Disease

Every single feature about you is genetic. Patients regularly ask me if their genes have anything to do with their periodontal disease. They want to know if their parents’ gum disease has been inherited, for example. The answer is that a patient’s oral health is definitely affected by genetics, although the precise mechanisms are not well understood.

I gained a true appreciation for genetics affecting dental health when I went into the Air Force after I graduated from dental school and had the opportunity to see many patients. It has become apparent to me over the years that there are people who clean their teeth regularly and fairly effectively yet have one or both dental diseases—decay and gum disease. On the other hand there are some people who have no dental decay and no gum disease even when they do not pay any attention to cleaning their teeth.

In dentistry there are diseases that manifest in the mouth because the body is unable to protect itself from bacteria or viruses or from other conditions such as metabolic problems. In the case of periodontal disease and decay, a person’s immune system can either reduce or eliminate bacteria or it can fail to stop the disease process. Sometimes patients go through a period of time in their life when they are very susceptible to decay and/or gum disease and then their immune system shifts and they have fewer periodontal issues.

This phenomenon is similar to what people with allergies experience. Some people do not have allergies until they are well into adulthood, perhaps in their 50s. Similarly our immune systems change as we age and this can affect our overall oral health and periodontal wellness. This immune system shift is all genetically controlled. Indeed, it is true that our periodontal health is affected by genetics.

Dr. Karl A. Rose
Periodontist
Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington
Chevy Chase, MD
New Patients Welcome
www.periodontistwashingtondc.com

Periodontal Laser Therapy Often Produces Great Results

Laser therapy is often the preferred method of treating periodontal disease because it is easier on the patient. Laser treatment is minimally invasive, causes less discomfort, and leads to a quicker recovery than more conventional surgical treatments. With the laser, there is also less bleeding, swelling, and scaring, and the laser actually targets the diseased tissue and does not destroy healthy tissue. Patients often like the concept of laser treatment, and some patients who have avoided conventional surgical treatment are willing to accept laser treatment as a modern alternative to traditional gum surgery that requires a scalpel and sutures.

Laser treatment is also very precise. With the conventional surgical treatment of periodontal disease, the process begins to create gum recession because some of the height of the gum pocket is inevitably compromised. Therefore, with periodontal treatment that is not laser therapy, it is quite important to maintain excellent oral hygiene with regular hygiene visits to the dental office.

The decision to choose between laser or traditional treatment depends on many factors, including the severity of the disease and tissue types, which are related to the thickness of the tissue. Although I perform many laser procedures with excellent results, for some of my patients I feel that traditional surgical treatment is more appropriate to the patient’s needs. To properly treat the patient there are times when I use a combination of traditional therapies and laser therapies. I am also flexible. If during a laser procedure the treatment is not achieving the desired results for the patient, then I will make the decision to return to conventional surgical treatment. The goal is always to use the best possible treatment to eliminate periodontal disease.

 

Dr. Karl A. Rose
Periodontist
Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington
Chevy Chase, MD
New Patients Welcome
www.periodontistwashingtondc.com

Periodontist Dr. Karl A. Rose Influences Students and Patients Worldwide

As a student in the periodontal specialty program at the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, I had the good fortune to train under some very important teachers in the world of dentistry. My mentors were teachers who gave freely of their time. Their influence on me was so profound that I decided to give back to others in a similar way.

For over two decades I volunteered my time teaching at the University of Pennsylvania, which receives people from all over the world. It has been an honor and a pleasure to work with so many students who in turn help many patients in other parts of the world.

I always told my students that the most personally satisfying aspect of my profession and career is treating patients who for one reason or another became dentally crippled. Without intervention their lives would have been unhappy to a great degree because they did not have the ability to chew and swallow well. Living with dental infirmity can be very stressful because severe dental problems affect a person’s ability to smile, laugh, or even speak.

My perspective comes from watching dental infirmities occur in my older relatives, an experience that made me very sensitive to the need for quality dental care. As an accomplished periodontist, I have worked with patients with significant dental problems who needed my help to improve their health. My work with these patients has given them many decades of full dental function. This type of complete turnaround has been the most rewarding experience of my career.

As a practitioner, researcher, and teacher, it is very satisfying to know that I have helped many people around the world directly or indirectly—beyond the borders of my dental office or the classroom.

 

Dr. Karl A. Rose
Periodontist
Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington
Chevy Chase, MD
New Patients Welcome
www.periodontistwashingtondc.com

Tooth Extraction Requires Attention to Both Physical and Emotional Comfort

It is understandable that patients have emotional factors that dentists have to consider when teeth cannot be saved. Most patients, think that they are embarking on a painful journey when they come in to have a tooth removed. When they need to have multiple teeth extracted, their anxiety grows exponentially.

Prior to the procedure the patient is focused on the process of tooth removal, but today we have very effective ways to anesthetize patients. I very rarely face a situation where a patient feels pain and there is nothing we can do about it, or feels pain after we have administered anesthetics. In fact, most people are pleasantly surprised that we kept them so comfortable during the procedure.

There are also emotional factors to consider when patients are contemplating losing a tooth, because they do not want to lose a body part. As an analogy one might think about a person losing their little toe. Most people understand that they do not really need their little toe, but removing it would be a body disfigurement that leaves the person no longer whole. The prospect of losing a tooth may trigger a similar emotional response which can be very stressful.

Another possible concern a patient may have is worrying about what their significant other will think of them if they are missing teeth. Some people have memories of seeing their grandparents’ dentures or partial dentures, and they are certain it is not an acceptable option for how they want to live. We reassure our patients by explaining that having to take out artificial teeth out at night is only one option; we now have dental implants that remain fixed in the mouth and provide the closest possible substitute for natural teeth.

In my periodontal practice, we take time to help patients understand very quickly that our goal is to alleviate their pain and help them return to having a healthy mouth. We listen to patients’ concerns and pay close attention to making sure they are physically and emotionally comfortable. We like to say that we are concerned about the entire patient, not just their teeth.

Dr. Karl A. Rose
Periodontist
Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington
Chevy Chase, MD
New Patients Welcome
www.periodontistwashingtondc.com

The Personal Touch of Dr. Karl A. Rose’s Periodontal Office

Many patients are anxious about coming to a periodontist’s office. My team and I purposefully provide a personal touch to help patients feel relaxed and comfortable when they come into the office for a visit. I find that a personal touch can sometimes best be accomplished with a little bit of touching. In our culture we shake hands or perhaps give people a hug.

Historically, shaking hands shows you do not have a weapon in your hand, and in modern times it serves to start breaking down barriers through this simple physical contact. When I am with patients I want to build trust. I offer to shake hands and I encourage them to call me by my first name. I try to break down the barriers that otherwise prevent them from being comfortable.

I also like to use humor with patients. This approach works most of the time, but some people do not think that the dental office is an appropriate place for humor. They are very serious when they get here, and they are very anxious, so there is a risk that my humor may backfire—but I find that a touch of humor goes a long way to help relax people.

Another consideration is that the doctor and all the staff must appear to be confident and know what they are doing. Patients notice this demeanor and they feel that they are in good hands.

Observing a well-run periodontal practice is much like watching a well-choreographed dance. Our office routines are smooth; all members of the team move in harmony achieved by years of working together. Patients get comfortable with the competence of our staff and systems. They know they are safe and being treated by true professionals when they come to our office.

Dr. Karl A. Rose
Periodontist
Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington
Chevy Chase, MD
New Patients Welcome
www.periodontistwashingtondc.com

Establishing Good Dental Health as a Foundation for Dental Implants

I am a firm believer in therapeutic efforts that help patients. We help patients become free of pain and comfortable with their dentition so they can function properly. We are dedicated to comprehensive dental care and the good health that goes along with accomplishing long-term dental stability. To that end, in my practice I focus on helping the patient attain good periodontal health before we replace missing teeth with dental implants.

A good clinician knows how to sequence treatment to get the best result. If a patient has current problems that keep them from being totally functional or free of pain, then we need to take care of those problems first. The next immediate course of care is to eliminate disease before we proceed to reconstructive treatments.

This way of thinking is very similar to how a plastic surgeon would approach treating a burn patient. The first step is to help the patient’s tissue to heal in preparation for the reconstructive phases of treatment. Similarly, when tissue in the mouth is recovering from gum disease, we wait for the tissue to heal before starting dental reconstructive treatments.

This methodology is also used when it comes to dental implant treatment. When a patient has periodontal disease, we work with them to help get them healthy again. This treatment might also include growing bone in the jaw that has experienced bone loss while teeth have been missing, or a series of specialized cleanings or gum grafting procedures. We want to develop a stable bone and gum structure as a foundation for the implants.

We talk with the patient about their timeline and needs for dental procedures and create a treatment plan that is comfortable for them. We achieve great results with dental implants and other procedures for patients by focusing on healing first.

Dr. Karl A. Rose
Periodontist
Periodontal & Implant Associates of Greater Washington
Chevy Chase, MD
New Patients Welcome
www.periodontistwashingtondc.com